Direction for One-Way Machining

Introduction

There are two main categories for selecting a One-Way machining direction. You can define the direction either dependent on spindle direction or independent of the spindle direction.

Parameters

To define the moving direction of the tool on the part in relation to the spindle direction, use one of the following options.

 

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To define the moving direction of the tool on the part independent from the spindle direction, use one of the following options.

 

CWiseCCWiseMWMA.png

 

 


NOTE:


Examples

 

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How it Works

Generally the operation only works properly and effectively when you use tool axis control strategy Tool Axis Will be Tilted Relative to Cutting Direction. With other tilt options, it is not possible to clearly define the machining cut direction. The reason for this is the operation decides the cut direction itself. The operation decides between two calculation routines depending only on one factor: the value of the side tilt angle of the cutting direction.

 

The machining is recognized as swarf machining. Then the definition of climb or conventional is very easy. The spindle always (except of very few cases) turns clockwise. The tool movement is opposite to the spindle rotation. So you can say that if the tool is on the right side (relative to moving direction of the tool) it always is conventional. When climb milling is set, the tool movement and the spindle rotation have to be in the same direction. The tool always machines on the left side.

 

It is a little bit more complicated than swarf milling. Here you don't have a swarf face and you don't work with the side of the tool. You can't define if you are positioned right or left from the contour. Imagine that you are working on a flat face, machining simple parallel cuts. You just don't know where to align the tool because there are no side faces showing where there is material. Nevertheless, the function works as follows: In the flat face example, the paths are parallel to each other:

 

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  1. Generally, for Clockwise the tool movement has clockwise direction. For Counterclockwise, the tool movement has counter-clockwise direction. But there are restrictions which you have to consider. The direction can't be clearly defined for every pattern strategy. Most important here is that for all strategies you have to have a closed toolpath. This means that a cut has to end where it starts. Whenever a toolpath is not closed, you can virtually enforce the cutting direction by activating the Enforce Cutting Direction option. The toolpath is not actually closed but internally the calculation assumes a closed contour.

 

 

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When you have a closed toolpath

 

The direction is defined about the view direction onto the first cut. With the function you define two angles which span a plane (parallel cuts). The cuts are parallel to this plane. When you look perpendicular to that plane in the direction where the cuts proceed, you get the cutting direction defined. Both clockwise and counter-clockwise work well with Parallel cuts.

 

 

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Here the direction is defined with the curve and the cut planes. Important here is the chaining of the curve, on which side it starts and to where it points. Because this defines the view direction. If you start the chain from the other side, the machining would begin from the other side. With Cuts Along Curve, Cwise and Ccwise always work right.

 

 

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Here the direction can't be clearly defined. So setting the direction to clockwise or counterclockwise doesn't always work in this case. This has two reasons: The direction depends of the chaining of the curves. You see that you got two curves and the system doesn't decide which curve shall define the direction because both are weighted the same in the calculation. Also it is not clearly defined which curve is the first and which the second. It is a user choice. You can define the cut proceeding with selecting which curve is the first and which the last, but this has no influence on the direction.

 

Here the direction will be defined by the curve and the cut sequence direction. Important here is the chaining of the curve, on which side it starts and where it points to. So if in your closed contour the curve points clock wise, setting clockwise lets the tool run clockwise. If the chaining is counterclockwise and you set to clock wise the machining would be counter clockwise. If you set here the direction to counterclockwise the machining would be counterclockwise.

 

 

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Here the direction is defined only by the curve chaining direction. So in closed contour the curve points clockwise, setting clockwise lets the tool run clockwise. If the chaining is counterclockwise, and you select clockwise, the machining is counter-clockwise. If you set the direction to counterclockwise the machining would be counterclockwise.

 

Here the direction can't be clearly defined. So setting the direction to clockwise or counter-clockwise doesn't always work in this case.

 

Here the direction can't be clearly defined. So setting the direction to clockwise or counter-clockwise doesn't always work in this case.